Outcomes of human adenovirus infection and disease in a retrospective cohort of pediatric solid organ transplant recipients.

TitleOutcomes of human adenovirus infection and disease in a retrospective cohort of pediatric solid organ transplant recipients.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsBoge CLK, Fisher BT, Petersen H, Seif AE, Purdy DR, Galetaki DM, Hodinka RL, Cárdenas AMaría, Kajon AE
JournalPediatr Transplant
Paginatione13510
Date Published2019 Jun 18
ISSN1399-3046
Abstract

Information about HAdV infection in SOT recipients is limited. We aimed to describe HAdV infection epidemiology and outcomes in a single-center retrospective cohort during the era of PCR availability. SOT recipients transplanted at the CHOP 2004-2013 were followed up for 180 days post-transplant. HAdV infection was defined as a positive HAdV PCR from a clinical specimen. HAdV disease was defined by organ-specific radiologic and/or laboratory abnormalities. No HAdV surveillance protocols were employed during the study period; testing was solely per clinician discretion. Progression of HAdV infection was defined as HAdV disease or ≥1-log viral load increase since a corresponding site's first positive specimen. Of the assembled 425 SOT recipients, 227 (52.6%) had ≥1 HAdV PCR. Twenty-four (10.6%) had ≥1 HAdV-positive PCR. HAdV-positive subjects were younger than uninfected subjects (2.0 years vs 6.5, P = 0.001). Infection incidence rates were highest in liver recipients (15.3%), followed by heart (8.6%), kidney (8.3%), and lung (4.2%). Four subjects (16.7%) met HAdV disease criteria at virus detection. Five subjects (20.8%) had progression of HAdV infection. All-cause mortality rates in positive and negative subjects were 0% and 3.9%, respectively. HAdV infection was infrequently detected in SOT recipients. Over one-third of HAdV-positive patients met disease criteria at detection or had infection progression, but none died. This low all-cause mortality raises questions about benefits of HAdV surveillance. Larger multicenter studies are needed to assess incidence variance by center and comparative effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.

DOI10.1111/petr.13510
Alternate JournalPediatr Transplant
PubMed ID31210395
Grant ListHHSN2722011000040C / / Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases /