Neighborhood deprivation increases the risk of Post-induction cesarean delivery.

TitleNeighborhood deprivation increases the risk of Post-induction cesarean delivery.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsMeeker JR, Burris HH, Bai R, Levine LD, Boland MRegina
JournalJ Am Med Inform Assoc
Date Published2021 Dec 17
ISSN1527-974X
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to measure the association between neighborhood deprivation and cesarean delivery following labor induction among people delivering at term (≥37 weeks of gestation).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of people ≥37 weeks of gestation, with a live, singleton gestation, who underwent labor induction from 2010 to 2017 at Penn Medicine. We excluded people with a prior cesarean delivery and those with missing geocoding information. Our primary exposure was a nationally validated Area Deprivation Index with scores ranging from 1 to 100 (least to most deprived). We used a generalized linear mixed model to calculate the odds of postinduction cesarean delivery among people in 4 equally-spaced levels of neighborhood deprivation. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis with residential mobility.

RESULTS: Our cohort contained 8672 people receiving an induction at Penn Medicine. After adjustment for confounders, we found that people living in the most deprived neighborhoods were at a 29% increased risk of post-induction cesarean delivery (adjusted odds ratio = 1.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.57) compared to the least deprived. In a sensitivity analysis, including residential mobility seemed to magnify the effect sizes of the association between neighborhood deprivation and postinduction cesarean delivery, but this information was only available for a subset of people.

CONCLUSIONS: People living in neighborhoods with higher deprivation had higher odds of postinduction cesarean delivery compared to people living in less deprived neighborhoods. This work represents an important first step in understanding the impact of disadvantaged neighborhoods on adverse delivery outcomes.

DOI10.1093/jamia/ocab258
Alternate JournalJ Am Med Inform Assoc
PubMed ID34921313
Grant List / / University of Pennsylvania /