The Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort in the CARRA Registry: Clinical Characteristics, Classification, and Outcomes.

TitleThe Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis Cohort in the CARRA Registry: Clinical Characteristics, Classification, and Outcomes.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsZisman D, Gladman DD, Stoll ML, Strand V, Lavi I, Hsu JJ, Mellins ED
Corporate AuthorsCARRA Legacy Registry Investigators
JournalJ Rheumatol
Volume44
Issue3
Pagination342-351
Date Published2017 Mar
ISSN0315-162X
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Children with clinically diagnosed juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) who were enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) registry (CARRA-JPsA) were classified according to pediatric International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) and adult criteria [Classification criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR)]. Data on demographic and clinical features at baseline and 1-year followup were analyzed and compared.

METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis was performed of CARRA-JPsA patients enrolled between May 2010 and December 2013 and stratified according to age at disease onset (≤ or > 4 yrs). Features of patients fulfilling ILAR and CASPAR criteria were compared at baseline and followup using chi square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney-McNemar, Wilcoxon signed rank, and t tests, as appropriate.

RESULTS: Among 361 children enrolled as CARRA-JPsA, 72.02% had symptom onset at > 4 years of age, with a male predominance and high prevalence of enthesitis. At followup, statistically significant improvements were reported in arthritis, dactylitis, enthesitis, psoriasis, sacroiliitis, and nail pitting, but not in health questionnaire (HQ) scores. Of the patients, 80.5% fulfilled ILAR criteria for JPsA. Fifty-two patients, whose disease fulfilled CASPAR criteria but had not been included in the JPsA cohort, manifested more enthesitis, sacroiliitis, inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis and less psoriasis.

CONCLUSION: The data support division of patients with JPsA into 2 clinical subgroups, according to age at disease onset. Improvement in objective findings did not correlate with changes in HQ scores. Pediatric rheumatologists currently do not diagnose JPsA in all children whose disease manifestations meet CASPAR criteria. Unification of adult and pediatric PsA classification criteria warrants consideration.

DOI10.3899/jrheum.160717
Alternate JournalJ. Rheumatol.
PubMed ID28148698