Imaging Intussusception in Children's Hospitals in the United States: Trends, Outcomes, and Costs.

TitleImaging Intussusception in Children's Hospitals in the United States: Trends, Outcomes, and Costs.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsOtero HJ, White AM, Khwaja AB, Griffis H, Katcoff H, Bresnahan BW
JournalJ Am Coll Radiol
Date Published2019 May 14
ISSN1558-349X
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe imaging utilization, outcomes, and cost in the management of intussusception between 2010 and 2017 in pediatric hospitals in the United States.

METHODS: All children (under 18 years of age) with a primary diagnosis of intussusception in a large administrative database were identified. Demographics, imaging, and costs were described.

RESULTS: There were 17,032 children (63.3% boys, 36.7% girls, mean age: 3.2 years) that had 20,655 hospital encounters for intussusception, and 88.5% were <5 years of age. The average length of stay was 2.8 days (median: 1 day), with rates of intensive care unit admission, 3.7%; 90-day readmission, 10.5%; and mortality, 0.2%. The surgical rate was 19.6%, and 93.5% (n = 19,301) of patients underwent imaging: 87.2% (n = 16,822) received ultrasound, 69.1% (n = 13,329) had fluoroscopy, 59% (n = 11,380) had abdominal radiographs, and 8.8% (n = 1,696) had CT. The reduction success rate for fluoroscopy was 77.9%. Surgery was more common in rural patients (26.8% versus 18.7% in urban patients, P < .001). Median encounter costs were $2,675 (interquartile range: $1,637-$5,465). Imaging cost represented a quarter (median $680, interquartile range: $372-1,069) of all costs. Higher costs (median) were associated with longer length of stay (<3 days: $858 versus >3 days: $5,342; use of CT ($4,168 versus $943 in patients without a CT), and surgery ($4,434 versus $860 without surgery).

CONCLUSION: The management of intussusception is mainly nonsurgical, most frequently involving imaging with ultrasound and fluoroscopy, and resulting in excellent outcomes in the great majority of the cases. Despite playing a central role for diagnosis and management, imaging only represents a fraction of total cost.

DOI10.1016/j.jacr.2019.04.011
Alternate JournalJ Am Coll Radiol
PubMed ID31092342