Feasibility and Acceptability of a Pilot Tailored Text Messaging Intervention for Adolescents and Young Adults Completing Cancer Treatment.

TitleFeasibility and Acceptability of a Pilot Tailored Text Messaging Intervention for Adolescents and Young Adults Completing Cancer Treatment.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsSchwartz LA, Daniel LC, Henry-Moss D, Bonafide CP, Li Y, Psihogios AM, Butler ES, Szalda D, Hoeve ESVer, Hobbie WL, Dowshen NL, Pierce L, Kersun LS, Barakat LP
JournalPsychooncology
Date Published2019 Nov 11
ISSN1099-1611
Abstract

PURPOSE: Despite cure, adolescents and young adults (AYA) who complete cancer treatment remain at risk for numerous physical and psychological late effects. However, engagement in recommended follow-up care, knowledge of cancer treatment history and risks, and adoption of health promoting behaviors are often suboptimal. The pilot randomized controlled trial assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a text messaging intervention (THRIVE; Texting Health Resources to Inform, motiVate, and Engage) designed to promote well-being, and health knowledge and behaviors.

METHODS: Sixty-one AYA who recently completed cancer therapy enrolled and were randomized to receive THRIVE (n=31) or an AYA survivor handbook (n=30). Participants from both groups completed baseline measures and follow-up surveys 16 weeks later. AYA randomized to THRIVE received 1-2 health-related text messages per day over 16 weeks.

RESULTS: THRIVE demonstrated a high level of acceptability and feasibility. Exploratory analyses highlighted promising improvements in knowledge, fruit/vegetable intake, and perceptions of health vulnerability.

CONCLUSIONS: Text messaging is an acceptable and feasible intervention approach for improving well-being and health of AYA survivors. Future research is needed to test the impact of text messaging in a larger trial, including whether or not such an intervention can improve clinical outcomes, such as survivors' engagement in follow-up care.

DOI10.1002/pon.5287
Alternate JournalPsychooncology
PubMed ID31713265