Diffusion tensor imaging of the kidney in healthy controls and in children and young adults with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

TitleDiffusion tensor imaging of the kidney in healthy controls and in children and young adults with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsSerai SD, Otero HJ, Calle-Toro JS, Berman JI, Darge K, Hartung EA
JournalAbdom Radiol (NY)
Date Published2019 Feb 19
ISSN2366-0058
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the kidneys and its derived parameters in children with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) versus healthy controls.

METHODS: In a prospective IRB-approved study, we evaluated the use of DTI to compare kidney parenchyma FA values in healthy controls (age-matched children with no history of renal disease) versus patients with ARPKD. A 20-direction DTI with b-values of b = 0 s/mm and b = 400 s/mm was used to acquire data in coronal direction using a fat-suppressed spin-echo echo-planar sequence. Diffusion Toolkit and TrackVis were used for analysis and segmentation. TrackVis was used to draw regions of interest (ROIs) covering the entire volume of the renal parenchyma, excluding the collecting system. Fibers were reconstructed using a deterministic fiber tracking algorithm. The FA values based on the ROI data, mean length, and volume of the tracks based on the fiber tracking data were recorded.

RESULTS: Eight healthy controls (mean age = 12.9 years ± 4.0; 1/8 males) and six ARPKD participants (mean age = 13.8 years ± 8.5; 5/6 males) were included in the study. Compared to healthy controls, patients with ARPKD had significantly lower FA values (0.33 ± 0.03 vs. 0.25 ± 0.02, p = 0.002) and mean track length (16.73 ± 3.43 vs. 11.61 ± 1.29 mm, p = 0.005).

CONCLUSION: DTI of the kidneys shows significantly lower FA values and mean track length in children and young adults with ARPKD compared to normal subjects. DTI of the kidney offers a novel approach for characterizing renal disease based on changes in diffusion anisotropy and kidney structure.

DOI10.1007/s00261-019-01933-4
Alternate JournalAbdom Radiol (NY)
PubMed ID30783727
Grant ListK23 DK109203 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States