Development and Testing of a Survey Measure of Organizational Perinatal Patient-Centered Care Culture.

TitleDevelopment and Testing of a Survey Measure of Organizational Perinatal Patient-Centered Care Culture.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsHandley SC, Passarella M, Martin AE, Lorch SA, Srinivas SK, Nembhard IM
JournalHealth Serv Res
Date Published2022 Feb 06
ISSN1475-6773
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To develop and test of a measure of patient-centered care (PCC) culture in hospital-based perinatal care.

DATA SOURCES: US perinatal hospitals; 1 provided survey development data and 14 contributed data for survey testing.

STUDY DESIGN: We used qualitative and quantitative methods to develop the Mother-Infant Centered Care (MICC) culture survey. Qualitative methods included observation, focus group, interviews, and expert consultations to adapt items from other settings and create new items capturing dimensions of PCC articulated by The Commonwealth Fund. We quantitatively assessed survey psychometric properties using reliability (Cronbach's α and Pearson correlation coefficients) and validity (exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis [CFA]) statistics, and refined the survey. After confirming aggregation suitability (ICCs), we calculated "MICC culture scores" at the individual-, unit-, and hospital-level and assessed associations between scores and survey-collected, staff-reported outcomes to evaluate concurrent validity.

DATA COLLECTION: Survey development included 12 site-visit observations, one semi-structured focus group (five participants), two semi-structured interviews, five cognitive interviews, and three expert consultations. Survey testing used online surveys administered to obstetric and neonatal unit staff (N=316).

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using responses from 10 hospitals with ≥4 responses from both units (n=240), the 20-item MICC culture survey demonstrated reliability (Cronbach's α=0.95) while capturing all PCC dimensions (subscale Cronbach's α=0.72-0.87). CFA showed validity through goodness-of-fit (overall chi-square=214 [p-value=0.012], SRMR=0.056, RMSEA=0.041, CFI=0.97, and TLI=0.96). Aggregation statistics (ICCs<0.05) justify unit- and hospital-level aggregation. Demonstrating preliminary validity, individual-, unit-, and hospital-level MICC culture scores were associated with all outcomes (satisfaction with care provided, within-unit team effectiveness, and relational coordination [RC] between units) (p-values<0.05), except for neonatal unit scores and RC (p-value=0.11).

CONCLUSIONS: The MICC culture survey is a psychometrically sound measure of PCC culture for hospital-based perinatal care. Survey scores are associated with staff-reported outcomes. Future studies with patient outcomes will aid identification of improvement opportunities in perinatal care.

DOI10.1111/1475-6773.13949
Alternate JournalHealth Serv Res
PubMed ID35128641