Daily chlorhexidine bathing to reduce bacteraemia in critically ill children: a multicentre, cluster-randomised, crossover trial.

TitleDaily chlorhexidine bathing to reduce bacteraemia in critically ill children: a multicentre, cluster-randomised, crossover trial.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMilstone AM, Elward A, Song X, Zerr DM, Orscheln R, Speck K, Obeng D, Reich NG, Coffin SE, Perl TM
Corporate AuthorsPediatric SCRUB Trial Study Group
JournalLancet
Volume381
Issue9872
Pagination1099-106
Date Published2013 Mar 30
ISSN1474-547X
KeywordsAcademic Medical Centers, Administration, Topical, Bacteremia, Baths, Child, Child, Preschool, Chlorhexidine, Critical Illness, Cross Infection, Cross-Over Studies, Disinfectants, Drug Eruptions, Female, Hospitals, University, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Investigational New Drug Application, Male, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bacteraemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Our objective was to assess whether daily bathing in chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) compared with standard bathing practices would reduce bacteraemia in critically ill children.

METHODS: In an unmasked, cluster-randomised, two-period crossover trial, ten paediatric intensive-care units at five hospitals in the USA were randomly assigned a daily bathing routine for admitted patients older than 2 months, either standard bathing practices or using a cloth impregnated with 2% CHG, for a 6-month period. Units switched to the alternative bathing method for a second 6-month period. 6482 admissions were screened for eligibility. The primary outcome was an episode of bacteraemia. We did intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analyses. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier NCT00549393).

FINDINGS: 1521 admitted patients were excluded because their length of stay was less than 2 days, and 14 refused to participate. 4947 admissions were eligible for analysis. In the ITT population, a non-significant reduction in incidence of bacteraemia was noted with CHG bathing (3·52 per 1000 days, 95% CI 2·64-4·61) compared with standard practices (4·93 per 1000 days, 3·91-6·15; adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 0·71, 95% CI 0·42-1·20). In the PP population, incidence of bacteraemia was lower in patients receiving CHG bathing (3·28 per 1000 days, 2·27-4·58) compared with standard practices (4·93 per 1000 days, 3·91-6·15; aIRR 0·64, 0·42-0·98). No serious study-related adverse events were recorded, and the incidence of CHG-associated skin reactions was 1·2 per 1000 days (95% CI 0·60-2·02).

INTERPRETATION: Critically ill children receiving daily CHG bathing had a lower incidence of bacteraemia compared with those receiving a standard bathing routine. Furthermore, the treatment was well tolerated.

FUNDING: Sage Products, US National Institutes of Health.

DOI10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61687-0
Alternate JournalLancet
PubMed ID23363666
PubMed Central IDPMC4128170
Grant List1 K23 AI081752 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
K23 AI081752 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
UL1 RR 025005 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States