Asking the Right Questions About Secondhand Smoke.

TitleAsking the Right Questions About Secondhand Smoke.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsKlein JD, Chamberlin ME, Kress EA, Geraci MW, Rosenblatt S, Boykan R, Jenssen B, Rosenblatt SM, Milberger S, Adams WG, Goldstein AO, Rigotti NA, Hovell MF, Holm AL, Vandivier RW, Croxton TL, Young PL, Blissard L, Jewell K, Richardson L, Ostrow J, Resnick EA
JournalNicotine Tob Res
Volume23
Issue1
Pagination57-62
Date Published2021 01 07
ISSN1469-994X
KeywordsAdult, Child, Counseling, Environmental Exposure, Humans, Smoke-Free Policy, Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Despite knowledge about major health effects of secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure, systematic incorporation of SHS screening and counseling in clinical settings has not occurred.

METHODS: A three-round modified Delphi Panel of tobacco control experts was convened to build consensus on the screening questions that should be asked and identify opportunities and barriers to SHS exposure screening and counseling. The panel considered four questions: (1) what questions should be asked about SHS exposure; (2) what are the top priorities to advance the goal of ensuring that these questions are asked; (3) what are the barriers to achieving these goals; and (4) how might these barriers be overcome. Each panel member submitted answers to the questions. Responses were summarized and successive rounds were reviewed by panel members for consolidation and prioritization.

RESULTS: Panelists agreed that both adults and children should be screened during clinical encounters by asking if they are exposed or have ever been exposed to smoke from any tobacco products in their usual environment. The panel found that consistent clinician training, quality measurement or other accountability, and policy and electronic health records interventions were needed to successfully implement consistent screening.

CONCLUSIONS: The panel successfully generated screening questions and identified priorities to improve SHS exposure screening. Policy interventions and stakeholder engagement are needed to overcome barriers to implementing effective SHS screening.

IMPLICATIONS: In a modified Delphi panel, tobacco control and clinical prevention experts agreed that all adults and children should be screened during clinical encounters by asking if they are exposed or have ever been exposed to smoke from tobacco products. Consistent training, accountability, and policy and electronic health records interventions are needed to implement consistent screening. Increasing SHS screening will have a significant impact on public health and costs.

DOI10.1093/ntr/ntz125
Alternate JournalNicotine Tob Res
PubMed ID31407779
PubMed Central IDPMC7974019